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Lesbian Homosexual And Bisexual Adults Are Thinner Than Straight Adults According To A New Study

Lesbian, homosexual, and bisexual people in England are less likely to be overweight than their straight counterparts, but they are more likely to have poor health in several areas.

The findings come from the National Institute for Social Research and UCL’s annual Health Survey for England, which was conducted from 2011 to 2018.

Specialists questioned and evaluated the health of 58,226 adults aged 16 and above, with 2% (1,132 people) identifying as lesbian, gay, or bisexual (LGB).

LGB adults (7% of those polled) were found to be more likely than heterosexuals (6% of those polled) to report having ‘poor’ or’very bad’ health.

They were also more likely than the general population (22%) to have a limiting long-term disease (26%)

Heterosexuals, on the other hand, were found to have a greater level of mental well-being, with an average score of 51.4 on the Warwick-Edinburgh Scale.

LGB adults, on the other hand, obtained an average of 48.9, with LGB women scoring even lower at 47.3.

The researchers also discovered that nearly a third of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender persons drink excessively, compared to just under a quarter of heterosexual adults.

However, the surveys found that just 51% of the adult LGB population in England is overweight or obese, compared to 63% of heterosexuals.

Lesbian, gay, and bisexual persons in England are less likely to be overweight than straight people, but they are more likely to have poor health in numerous areas, according to a study. KEY FINDINGS The incidence of severe long-term illness was greater among LGB adults (26%) than heterosexual adults (22%).

Smoking was shown to be more common among LGB people (27%) than it was among heterosexual persons (18%).

Adult smokers were found to be highest among LGB women (31%), and lowest among straight women (16%). However, the researchers found that LGB adults were less likely to suffer from musculoskeletal diseases, such as arthritis, rheumatism, or back issues, with a frequency of just 13% compared to 16% for straight adults.

The Health Survey for England is intended to track trends in the country’s health as well as offer estimates for the prevalence of specific diseases, risk factors, and behaviors throughout the population.

In 2011, the yearly survey series added a question about respondents’ sexual orientation for the first time — 20 years after the research began.

Participants were asked to identify as ‘heterosexual or straight,’ ‘gay or lesbian,’ ‘bisexual,’ ‘other,’ or ‘prefer not to say.’ LGB persons (seven percent) were found to be more likely than heterosexuals (six percent) to report experiencing ‘poor’ or’very bad’ health.

They were also more likely (26%) than the straight population (22%) to have a limiting long-term illness. The researchers also discovered that nearly a third of LGB people drink excessively, compared to just under a quarter of heterosexual adults.

A couple enjoying a drink in the picture. The survey can also provide health information split down by age, ethnicity, and gender.

‘The capacity to expose health inequalities is one of the largest benefits of collecting and releasing health data,’ said NHS Digital’s chief statistician, Chris Roebuck.

‘We’re excited to be able to provide these LGB statistics for the first time, which reveal significant variations in health status and behavior,’ he added.

The study’s findings were published in their entirety on the NHS Digital website.

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