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Juno Nasas 1 1 Billion Mission Capturesstarship Captain Views Of Jupiter And Ganymede

Advertisement In a series of photographs captured by the Juno probe before and after its 34th flyby of Jupiter, NASA has revealed a’starship captain’ point of view of Jupiter and its moon, Ganymede.

On June 7, the spacecraft sailed closer to Jupiter’s ice-encrusted moon than any other mission since the Galileo orbiter in 2000, capturing magnificent photographs of Ganymede, the solar system’s largest moon.

Juno’s photos were put together into a time-lapse animation that brings Earthlings within 645 miles of Ganymede at 41,600 mph.

The images reveal many dark and light zones on the moon, which are thought to be caused by ice sublimation (the process of ice turning into water vapor), as well as the crater Tros, which is one of Ganymede’s largest and brightest crater scars.

The animation also transports viewers to Jupiter, where they can see the planet’s famous swirling cyclones and’string of pearls.’ Scroll down for videos NASA has released a’starship captain’ point of view of Jupiter and its moon Ganymede (pictured), captured by the Juno probe before and after its 34th flyby of the gas giant.

NASA produced a three-and-a-half-minute video on Thursday that provides the world a closer look at Ganymede, which is generally obscured in the brightness of its parent planet.

Ganymede originated around 4.5 billion years ago, around the same time as Jupiter, and is the solar system’s ninth-largest object.

It is the only moon with its own magnetic field, which creates auroras in regions circling the moon’s north and south poles, which are ribbons of luminous, electrified gas.

After visitors have had their fill of Ganymede, the animation transports them 735,000 miles to Jupiter, a journey that takes Juno 14 hours and 50 minutes to complete.

The spectacular photographs of Ganymede were taken on June 7, when the spacecraft came closer to Jupiter’s ice-encrusted moon than any other craft since the Galileo orbiter in 2000. The imagery reveals numerous of the moon’s dark and light zones, which are thought to be caused by ice sublimation, as well as the crater Tros, which is one of the largest and brightest crater scars on Ganymede.

JunoCam captures the magnificent cyclones swirling around the north pole, as well as five of the gas giant’s’string of pearls’ – eight huge storms moving counterclockwise in the southern hemisphere that appear as white ovals – from this vantage point.

‘The animation exemplifies how lovely deep space travel can be,’ said Scott Bolton, Juno’s chief investigator.

‘The animation allows users to imagine themselves orbiting Jupiter and flying past one of Jupiter’s cold moons, allowing them to experience firsthand what it’s like to explore our solar system.’

After viewing Ganymede, the animation transports viewers 735,000 miles away to Jupiter, a journey that takes Juno 14 hours and 50 minutes to complete. Viewers are brought barely 2,100 miles above Jupiter’s stunning cloud tops (shown), a position when the big planet’s immense gravity has accelerated the spacecraft to over 130,000mph.

Juno set sail for Jupiter on August 4, 2011, and arrived on July 4, 2016, after a five-year trip.

The probe’s mission is to learn about Jupiter’s origins and evolution, search for a solid planetary core, map the planet’s magnetic field, detect water and ammonia in the deep atmosphere, and study auroras.

The 40-year-old enigma of how Jupiter releases a dazzling burst of X-rays every few minutes was just explained by Juno in a new research.

Juno’s JunoCam captures the spectacular cyclones (shown) spinning around Jupiter’s north pole. Juno also photographed Jupiter’s five’string of pearls’ (pictured) – eight huge storms rotating counterclockwise in the southern hemisphere that appear as white ovals University College London (UCL) experts analysed data from NASA’s Juno probe, which is presently or will be in orbit around the gas giant.

Heavy ion particles are then sent’surfing’ along magnetic field lines until they collide with the planet’s atmosphere, releasing energy in the form of X-rays and generating a beautiful aurora.

Researchers at UCL collaborated with specialists from the Chinese Academy of Sciences, and their findings were published in the journal Science Advances.

‘We’ve known for four decades that Jupiter produces X-ray aurora, but we didn’t know why,’ said research author Dr.

UCL’s Mullard Space Science Laboratory is home to William Dunn.

‘We only found out they existed when ions collided with the planet’s atmosphere.’

‘Now we know that these ions are transported by plasma waves – an explanation that has never been proposed previously, despite the fact that a comparable process is responsible for Earth’s aurora.’

‘As a result, it could be a universal occurrence that occurs in a variety of space situations.’

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