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The Norwegian Womens Handball Team Was Fined Eur1500 For Not Wearing Bikini Bottoms And Instead Wearing Shorts

The Norwegian women’s beach handball team was punished after refusing to compete in a match wearing bikini bottoms and instead competing in non-regulation shorts.
The European Handball Federation’s (EHF) Disciplinary Commission penalised the squad 1,500 euros ($1,300), or 150 euros (PS130) each player, on Monday.
The sanction follows their bronze-medal match loss to Spain at the European Beach Handball Championship in Bulgaria on Sunday, when they wore shorts instead of the bikini bottoms required by the International Handball Federation (IHF) standards.
On Tuesday, Norwegian officials responded sharply to the news.
After Monday’s judgment, Norway’s Minister of Culture and Sports, Abid Raja, tweeted, “It’s utterly ludicrous.”
‘What a shift of mindset is needed in the macho and conservative worldwide world of sport,’ said Eirik Sordahl, head of the Norwegian Volleyball Federation. ‘By 2021, it shouldn’t even be an issue.’
‘Of course, we would pay any fine,’ Kare Geir Lio, president of the Norwegian Handball Federation, told the AFP news agency on Monday.
He went on to say, ‘We’re all in the same boat.’
Katinka Haltvik, a handball player for Norway, declared ahead of the fine that the squad would gladly pay it, according to public television NRK.
The squad was supposed to be fined only 50 euros (PS43) per player, hence the fine is 1,000 euros higher than projected.
Beach sports have always had a clothing issue, with some female athletes finding bikinis humiliating or impractical.
While bikinis have not been required for beach volleyball players since 2012, IHF rules say that “female athletes must wear bikini bottoms” with a “close fit,” a “cut on an upward angle toward the top of the leg,” and a “side depth of no more than 10 centimetres.”
Shorts are worn by male players.
Norway approached the European Handball Federation ahead of the European Championship to request permission to play in shorts, but was advised that breaking the regulations would result in sanctions.
Until their last match, they obliged.
‘The most essential thing is to have equipment that athletes are comfortable with,’ Lio explained, adding that ‘it should be a free option within a standardised framework.’
The subject has been argued in beach sports circles for some years, as some players find the bikini humiliating or just impractical. For discarding the regulation bikini bottoms, the Norwegian women’s team (shown in 2017 wearing bikini bottoms) was fined 150 euros per player – a total of 1,500 euros.
In an email, EHF spokesman Andrew Barringer said, “The EHF is dedicated to bringing this matter forward in the interest of its member federations, but it must equally be said that a change of the regulations can only happen at IHF level.”
German beach volleyball stars Karla Borger and Julia Sude announced earlier this year that they would boycott a tournament in Qatar because it is “the only country” where players are prohibited from wearing bikinis on the field.
‘We are there to do our job, but we are not allowed to wear our work attire,’ Borger said at the time to a radio station.
‘This is actually the only place and the only tournament where the government tells us how to perform our job – we’re criticizing that,’ Borger said. The FIVB World Tour event was held in the Middle Eastern country, but severe regulations about on-court clothes had forced Borger and her doubles partner Sude to skip it.
German beach volleyball stars Karla Borger and Julia Sude (pictured) announced earlier this year that they would boycott a tournament in Qatar because it is “the only country” where players are prohibited from wearing bikinis on the field. But, the Qatar Volleyball Association (QVA) said there would be “no limitations” on players wearing bikinis.
Female players were required to wear shirts and long pants rather than bikinis, as the world beach volleyball federation FIVB stated, “out of respect for the host country’s culture and traditions.”
Qatar is a strict Islamic country where women are required to dress modestly, but adherence is spotty due to the huge number of foreign workers and efforts to attract tourism.

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