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Instagram Has Launched A Service Called Boundaries Which Allows Users To Conceal Comments From Those Who Do Not Follow Them

Instagram has unveiled a slew of new tools to combat troll abuse, including one that lets users immediately hide comments from people who don’t follow them.
The Limits feature’s goal is to prevent waves of abuse from accounts that ‘pile on in the moment,’ according to the Facebook-owned site.
That comes as social media continues to be scrutinized for how it handles abuse in the aftermath of racist attacks on England footballers Marcus Rashford, Jadon Sancho, and Bukayo Saka during the Euro 2020 final.
To see the video, scroll down. Instagram has announced new tools to combat troll abuse, including Limits (shown), which allows users to instantly hide comments from anyone who doesn’t follow them. Police arrest 11 individuals in connection with racist social media abuse of England players following their Euro 2020 defeat As of August 5, police have arrested 11 persons aged 18 to 63 in connection with the racist social media abuse of England stars following their Euro 2020 defeat.
Three are from London, two are from Christchurch, Dorset, one is from Runcorn, Cheshire, one is from Sale, Greater Manchester, one is from Folkestone, Kent, one is from Reading, one is from Shrewsbury, and one is from Worcester.
According to the UK Football Police Unit, 34 of the 207 illicit social media posts originated from accounts in the UK and 123 from foreign nations.
Following England’s penalty shootout loss to Italy, Twitter stated the UK was “by far” the leading source of “abhorrent racist abuse” on its site.
Although it did not say how many accounts were suspended, the social media network said that 99 percent of the accounts it suspended because of the abuse were not anonymous.
Advertising Restrictions would allow those to automatically conceal comments and direct message requests from users who do not follow them or who have only recently followed them.
It will be available to all Instagram users worldwide starting today, and users will be able to choose how long they want to hide comments and message requests from non-followers and those who have only recently started following them.
Instagram’s in-app warnings for individuals who try to post abuse have been beefed up, with users being warned that if they continue to make abusive remarks, their accounts will be deleted.
It’ll also make its Hidden Words filter feature available to all users worldwide, allowing them to block words, phrases, and emojis they don’t want to view.
The new capabilities, according to the business, are designed to provide users greater power while still protecting their safety when using the site.
The Limits feature, according to Tom Gault, Instagram’s public policy manager for Europe, was introduced to fight events like the Euro 2020 final, when public figures witness a rapid rise of targeted comments and message requests in the aftermath of an event.
‘Our own research, as well as comments from public figures, suggests that the majority of the vitriol aimed towards high-profile persons comes from those who don’t follow them or who have just followed them,’ he said.
‘And this is the kind of behavior we witnessed after the Euros final,’ Twitter said yesterday. Following England’s penalty shootout loss to Italy in the Euro 2020 final, Twitter said the UK was “by far” the primary source of “abhorrent racist abuse” on its site.
Although it did not say how many accounts were suspended, the social media network said that 99 percent of the accounts it suspended because of the abuse were not anonymous.
As of last week, 11 people ranging in age from 18 to 63 had been arrested in connection with the abuse aimed towards Marcus Rashford, Bukayo Saka, and Jadon Sancho after they missed penalties in England’s loss to Croatia.
According to the UK Football Police Unit, 34 of the 207 illicit social media posts originated from accounts in the UK and 123 from foreign nations.
The goal of the Limits feature, according to Instagram, is to stop waves of abuse from accounts who ‘pile on in the moment.’
It’s also bringing its Hidden Words filter feature (shown) to all users worldwide, allowing people to block words, phrases, and emojis they don’t want to view. The move comes in the wake of racist assaults on England footballers Marcus Rashford, Jadon Sancho, and Bukayo Saka (pictured with manager Gareth Southgate) following the Euro 2020 final.
Em Sheldon, who has over 117,000 Instagram followers and documents her life, has warned that the daily attacks could lead to deeper sadness and suicide.
The 27-year-old explained how some people on the internet’s “black area” saw it as their “single mission to ruin our life.”
Many people become fascinated with them and write hate about them all day, she added, adding that they became especially ‘mad’ when they started making money from advertisements.
Nevertheless, the “worst aspect” was that it mostly came from “mature women” with children and solid jobs.
Ms Sheldon was speaking to the Technology, Culture, Media, and Sport Committee, which is investigating the rise of “influencer culture” and its implications for society.
Advertisement According to Mr Gault, Instagram discovered that certain celebrities and public figures did not want to completely remove comments because they often receive a large number of messages of support.
‘Frequently, the occurrence that prompted the rise in comments also results in a flood of supporting responses from long-term fans.’
People are still interested in hearing from that group,’ he said.
‘That is why we honestly believe this feature will be so beneficial; it means you can hear from your returning followers while limiting contact with individuals who may be coming to your account to target you.’ In the future, the tool might be expanded to automatically encourage users to turn on Limits when the platform indicates a user may be seeing a spike in comments and direct messages.
‘We don’t accept hate speech or bullying on Instagram, and we remove it whenever we find it,’ Instagram CEO Adam Mosseri wrote in a blog post unveiling the new features.
‘We also want to protect people from having to experience abuse in the first place, which is why we’re always listening to feedback from experts and our community and developing new tools to give people more control over their Instagram experience and help protect them from abuse.’
‘We hope that these new capabilities will help individuals avoid viewing unpleasant content, whether it’s racist, sexist, homophobic, or any other kind of abuse.’
‘We recognize that there is more work to be done, including enhancing our systems to discover and delete abusive content more rapidly, as well as holding individuals who publish it accountable.’
‘We also recognize that, while we are dedicated to doing everything we can to combat hate on our platform, these issues are larger than we are.’
‘We will continue to invest in organizations dedicated to racial justice and equity, and we look forward to expanding our collaboration with industry, governments, and non-governmental organizations to educate and combat hatred.’
This project is still ongoing, and we’ll keep you updated on our progress.’

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